EU TYRE LABELLING REGULATION 1222/2009 – GENERAL INFO

The Tyre Label is a mark for motor vehicle tyres. Manufacturers of tyres for cars, light and heavy trucks must specify fuel consumption, wet grip and noise classification of the product by means of a sticker or a label starting in November 2012.

This information must also be included in the technical promotional materials. The tyre label will use a classification from the best (green category "A") to the worst performance (red category "G” for Car and “F” for truck).

This initiative results from a proposal by the EU Commission in 2008 and it is part of the Energy Efficiency Action Plan, designed to improve the energy performance of products, buildings and services to reduce energy consumption by 20% until 2020.

(Source: European Commission)


FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION SEE ALSO:

European Commission for Energy >
WIKIPEDIA >

PIRELLI COMMITMENT

Pirelli, as well the entire tyre industry, welcomes the introduction of the tyre label as a good tool to help the end-users in collecting some essential information when choosing new tyres. But the tyre label cannot substitute the wide range of informations offered by the tests performed by specialised magazines. Trustworthy, independent and reliable evaluations of tyre’s performances. Pirelli would like to remind to all end-users that the overall value of the tyre cannot be judged only by the rolling resistance, the wet braking and the external noise values; there are several additional elements (handling (wet and dry), aquaplaning, high speed behaviour, dry braking, wear, snow performance for winter tyres, ...) that have to be considered in order to choose the best product fitting your needs.

HOW TO READ A LABEL

The EU Tyre Labelling Regulation 1222/2009 will provide standardised informations on three tyre performance attribute:

FUEL EFFICIENCY

Associated to the tyre's
Rolling resistence

The Regulation requires that all the tyres produced after June 2012 and on sale in the EU after November 2012 will carry a sticker or have a label in their close proximity to be shown to the end user before purchasing(*).

The label is intended to give end users some essential information to help them when choosing new tyres.
(*) This information needs to be provided concerning passenger car tyres, light truck tyres and heavy duty vehicle tyres.

Rolling Restistance is a force acting opposite to the travel direction when the tyre is rolling.
Considering that tyres contribute up to 20% of the overall fuel consumption for a car and up to 35% for a truck, it is important to reach low Rolling Resistance values.
Let’s understand how it works: due to the vehicle load, the tyre is deformed in the contact area with the road surface dissipating energy in form of heat. The higher deformations, the higher the rolling resistance and consequently more fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.
In the EU tyre Regulation label, rolling resistance is expressed in grades, ranging from A (best grading) to F for industrial vehicles and G for cars (worst grading). The difference between each grade means a reduction or increase in fuel consumption of between 2.5% - 4.5% for a car and 5%-8% for a Truck. For a car that could be also roughly expressed in terms of 0.1l/100km.

SAFETY

Associated to the tyre's
Wet grip

The Regulation requires that all the tyres produced after June 2012 and on sale in the EU after November 2012 will carry a sticker or have a label in their close proximity to be shown to the end user before purchasing(*).

The label is intended to give end users some essential information to help them when choosing new tyres.
(*) This information needs to be provided concerning passenger car tyres, light truck tyres and heavy duty vehicle tyres.

Wet grip is one of the most important safety characteristic of a tyre. Excellent grip on wet means shorter braking distances when driving in rainy weather. 
There are other important parameters which are relevant for safety but wet grip was chosen as the most representative situation in order to compare different tyres. For a car the difference between each grade means an increase or decrease in stopping distance of roughly 3 and 6 meters when braking from 80km/h.

NOISE LEVEL

Associated to the tyre's
External noise level (dB)

The Regulation requires that all the tyres produced after June 2012 and on sale in the EU after November 2012 will carry a sticker or have a label in their close proximity to be shown to the end user before purchasing(*).

The label is intended to give end users some essential information to help them when choosing new tyres.
(*) This information needs to be provided concerning passenger car tyres, light truck tyres and heavy duty vehicle tyres.

Traffic noise is a relevant environmental issue determined by several factors such as:
Traffic intensity
Vehicle type
Driving style
Tyre-Road interaction

The value indicated in the label is not the internal that the driver will perceive while driving, but the external one, that is contributing to acoustic pollution.

It is expressed in decibel (dB) and split in 3 cathegories:
1 black sound wave = 3dB less than the future tighter European limit. 2 black sound waves = already compliant with the future European limit. 3 black sound waves = compliant with the current European limit.
The more black bars shown on the label, the louder the tyre.

FAQ'S

Do all tyres fall under the scope of the Regulation?

Are there any plans to issue an EU-fuel savings calculator showing the impact of differently labelled tyres on fuel consumption/fuel spending?

Are there any plans to include retreads?

Why are „POR“- tyres excluded from labelling?

How is the compliance with the tyre label regulation secured?

What is the difference between limit and grading?

How is the measured wet grip linked to road safety especially when it comes to different road conditions (dry, wet, snowy, icy)?

What is the relationship between wet grip and RR?

How does RR contribute to vehicle fuel consumption? What other factors contribute to fuel consumption?

What is rolling resistance (RR) ?